Charge Up for Good Health

My boyfriend says the Valentine’s Day chocolate he got me is actually good for my teeth. Could this be true?

My boyfriend says the Valentine’s Day chocolate he got me is actually good for my teeth. Could this ...

You’re going to love my answer: Yes!

Chocolate, especially the dark kind, is the only type of candy that romances you with antioxidants called tannins. These antioxidants not only protect your heart, but also safeguard your smile by helping to prevent tooth decay. So if your sweetie bought you a treat for Valentine’s Day, we hope it’s the solid dark kind or even chocolate-dipped fruit. Since these still contain sugar and extra calories, limit yourself to a piece or two and brush afterward.

Try to break it off with other seasonal options: Red Hots, for instance, are sticky and adhere to teeth, and the acid in sour conversation hearts may erode tooth enamel. Brushing right after eating these treats actually makes matters worse because you’re scrubbing the acid onto your teeth. Neutralize it first by drinking water or plain milk, and then brush your teeth a half hour later.

Curious about another health or lifestyle issue? Tweet us your question @Completely_You, and we’ll get an expert to answer

Photo: @iStockphoto.com/clubfoto

 

 


This site is provided by SUDLER PROPERTY MANAGEMENT